Tag Archives: Faux Batik

Faux Batik Technique How-to

Faux Batik Stamping

Oh, my…we are going to have FUN!  For those of you who have never played with Faux Batik before, you are going to love the technique I’m sharing with you today.  It’s been around for a long time, it is simple to do, and adds a ton of visual interest to any stamped project. 

What is Faux Batik?

Batik, as defined by Mr. Webster is ” a fabric printed by an Indonesian method of hand-printing textiles by coating with wax the parts not to be dyed; also : the method itself.”  That’s as clear as mud, isn’t it?  But a picture is worth a thousand words: 017 (2) Want to learn how?  Read on!

Faux Batik Technique

Begin with a stamped image.  For this project, I used Stampin’ Up’s Sweet Floral Background Stamp.  I used my Distress Markers to color directly onto the stamp. You can use whatever color palette you like, but I chose Dusty Concord, Stormy Sky, Broken China, and Shabby Shutters.  Once the stamp was fully inked, I lightly “huffed” over the ink to re-moisten and stamped onto a sheet of vintage dictionary paper.  I immediately covered the inked page with clear embossing powder and used my heat gun to emboss the image.  Then, I used Distress Markers to add some contrasting colors to the centers of the flowers and the leaves.

Oh, the IRON-y!

Sorry…I love puns.  For this part of the technique, you will need an old iron.  You can use your good iron if you want to, but bear in mind that there is a chance of ruining the iron.  Of course, if you hate to iron, and are looking for a good excuse to quit ironing, by all means, use your good iron.  I found an iron for $2 at a yard sale, and I use it for my messy, crafty, ironing needs.  You will also need clean newsprint, or brown paper (like lunch sack weight, or the kind used for packaging. ) I , of course, have about a mile of brown paper saved in the Closet of Shame, so this is what I used.

  I set an old towel on a countertop, heat the iron to high and lay my stamped/embossed image between two pieces of brown paper.  I then iron over the top sheet of brown paper.  This will melt the embossing powder, and the brown paper will absorb it.  You may have to move to a fresh section of paper as you repeat this step until all embossing powder has been remelted and absorbed.  You will want to remove the brown paper quickly and carefully.  If the embossing powder cools, it will stick to your image! If it sticks, just reheat with the iron. It should look like this: 016 (2)

This is one of those techniques that is addictive!  It also looks more impressive in real life, but I encourage you to give it a whirl.  It’s a ton of fun, and gives you a lot of bang for your buck, so to speak.  Here are some more images of the card I made using this technique: 015 (2) 021 (2) 020 (2) 019 (2) 018 (2)

Coming soon: Emboss Resist Technique

Join me tomorrow for another great embossing technique.  If today’s post didn’t send you running out the door for a fresh supply of embossing powder, then tomorrow’s post featuring an “emboss-resist” will for sure!  In the meantime, I’m happy to answer any questions you might have about the faux-batik technique I’ve shared with you today.  As always, I thank you for taking the time to read my little blog.  I greatly appreciate your comments and thoughts, and will do my best to reply to every comment you leave for me.  Until tomorrow,

Cheerio,

kathy

 

 

 

 

 

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